RUS


Ghost Fleet (16+)

USA, 2018, colour, 90 min.
Directors: Shannon Service, Jeffrey Waldron
The Thai fish industry is the largest in the world. And it is not limited to the framework of the region. Thailand is the second largest supplier of fish to the United States. When fish are needed as much and as quickly as anything else in the modern economy, finding workers is not easy. Therefore, many companies simply kidnap people from Thailand, Indonesia, Burma and Cambodia. Young men come to their senses already on ships that never land. Now they are expected to work 20 hours a day, they are beaten, sleep on the floor or in a cage and no hope. The only way to escape is to jump straight into the water and try to get to the ground. One by one, the surviving fishermen come to Patima Tunpuchayakul, a human rights activist in Thailand who has made helping these men a matter of life. This is a film about how everything is connected in the modern global economy and about the place of human rights in it.

Shannon Service

Shannon Service

is an independent reporter and filmmaker whose work has appeared in The New York Times, the BBC and The Guardian of London. Service has won several reporting awards, including an Edward R. Murrow.

FILMOGRAPHY

Ghost Fleet, 2018.

Jeffrey Waldron

Jeffrey Waldron

was born in the United States. He graduated from USC’s Cinema-Television Production program and received an MFA in Cinematography from the American Film Institute Conservatory. He has been nominated for Best Cinematography at the Independent Spirit Awards.

FILMOGRAPHY

Loy Krathong, 2012; Rising from Ashes, 2012; Ghost Fleet, 2018.
USA, 2018, colour, 90 min.
Directors: Shannon Service, Jeffrey Waldron
The Thai fish industry is the largest in the world. And it is not limited to the framework of the region. Thailand is the second largest supplier of fish to the United States. When fish are needed as much and as quickly as anything else in the modern economy, finding workers is not easy. Therefore, many companies simply kidnap people from Thailand, Indonesia, Burma and Cambodia. Young men come to their senses already on ships that never land. Now they are expected to work 20 hours a day, they are beaten, sleep on the floor or in a cage and no hope. The only way to escape is to jump straight into the water and try to get to the ground. One by one, the surviving fishermen come to Patima Tunpuchayakul, a human rights activist in Thailand who has made helping these men a matter of life. This is a film about how everything is connected in the modern global economy and about the place of human rights in it.